What is the Net Promoter Score (NPS)?

The Net Promoter Score (NPS) is a widely-used gauge of customer / user satisfaction levels.  The lowest possible score is -100 and the highest possible score is 100. Best practice is considered to be 50; the average online service has an NPS of -4.

The NPS specifically asks whether you would recommend the site or product to a friend. Response options vary from 0 (lowest) to 10 (highest).

– Users who score 0-6 are known as “detractors”
– Users who score 9-10 are known as “promoters”
– 7s and 8s are considered neutral and not included in the overall calculation

The NPS is calculated by taking the percentage of responders who are promoters, and subtracting the percentage who are detractors. Let’s see this using an example:

– 40 people give Product X a score of between 0-6
– 12 people give Product X a score of 7-8
– 18 people give Product X a score of 9-10

In this scenario, there have been a total of 70 scores given: 57% were detractors, 17% were neutral, 26% were promoters. 26-57 = -31. So Product X has an NPS of -31.

The NPS is also a great source of feedback, as users can leave comments to complement the score they have given. Furthermore, you might want to contact your promoters, as they could be potential ambassadors or champions for your product; or you may contact those that have rated your application poorly, to gather further information on how to improve.

The NPS form can be triggered when the user completes a certain action, integrated as part of your website (example from Kifi below). Some services request it sending an email to the user.

npskifi

For marketplace business models such us e-Bay, Airbnb or JustPark, having a separated NPS for users that create the supply (sellers, hosts listing properties, parking spaces, etc.) and for users that generate the demand (buyers, guests, etc.) can be convenient, as it  can help to understand the needs of specific segments.